Posts Tagged ‘1963’

Dr. King’s Day: Strength to Love

January 17, 2011

Strength to Love was published in 1963. It is a compendium of Dr. King’s sermons on peace, nonviolent protest, activism, and love.


The strong man holds in a living blend strongly marked opposites. The idealists are usually not realistic, and the realists are not usually idealistic. The militant are not generally known to be passive, nor the passive to be militant. Seldom are the humble self-assertive, or the self-assertive humble. But life at its best is a creative synthesis of opposites in fruitful harmony. The philosopher Hegel said that truth is found neither in the thesis nor the antithesis, but in the emergent synthesis which reconciles the two.


Jesus recognized the need for blending opposites. He knew that his disciples would face a difficult and hostile world, where they would confront the recalcitrance of political officials and the intransigence of the protectors of the old order. He knew that they would meet cold and arrogant men whose hearts had been hardened by the long winter of traditionalism. … And he gave them a formula for action, “Be ye therefore as wise as serpents, and harmless as doves.” … We must combine the toughness of the serpent with the softness of the dove, a tough mind and a tender heart.


As the first volume of sermons by an African American preacher widely available to a white audience, Strength to Love was a landmark work. His fusion of Christian teachings and social consciousness remains in print and continues to promote King’s vision of love as a potent social and political force for change, the efficacy of religious faith in surmounting evil, and the vital need for true human integration. This volume brought to the forefront King’s identity as a compelling, well educated, and compassionate preacher at a time when many whites knew him only as a civil rights leader. (“Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Global Freedom Struggle,” Stanford University Civil Rights encyclopedia.)

Dr. King’s Day: Strength to Love

January 15, 2010

Strength to Love was published in 1963. It is a compendium of Dr. King’s sermons on peace, nonviolent protest, activism, and love.


The strong man holds in a living blend strongly marked opposites. The idealists are usually not realistic, and the realists are not usually idealistic. The militant are not generally known to be passive, nor the passive to be militant. Seldom are the humble self-assertive, or the self-assertive humble. But life at its best is a creative synthesis of opposites in fruitful harmony. The philosopher Hegel said that truth is found neither in the thesis nor the antithesis, but in the emergent synthesis which reconciles the two.


Jesus recognized the need for blending opposites. He knew that his disciples would face a difficult and hostile world, where they would confront the recalcitrance of political officials and the intransigence of the protectors of the old order. He knew that they would meet cold and arrogant men whose hearts had been hardened by the long winter of traditionalism. … And he gave them a formula for action, “Be ye therefore as wise as serpents, and harmless as doves.” … We must combine the toughness of the serpent with the softness of the dove, a tough mind and a tender heart.


As the first volume of sermons by an African American preacher widely available to a white audience, Strength to Love was a landmark work. His fusion of Christian teachings and social consciousness remains in print and continues to promote King’s vision of love as a potent social and political force for change, the efficacy of religious faith in surmounting evil, and the vital need for true human integration. This volume brought to the forefront King’s identity as a compelling, well educated, and compassionate preacher at a time when many whites knew him only as a civil rights leader. (“Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Global Freedom Struggle,” Stanford University Civil Rights encyclopedia.)

NSFW November: Miss November 1963, Terre Tucker

November 23, 2009

The most shocking and interesting feature for me about Terre Tucker, Miss November 1963, is her real age at the time she posed for Playboy: the article that acommpanied her pictorial states she was 19, but it would seem there is some controversy around that figure.


Photographed by Stan Molinowski

This take-life-as-she-finds-it girl is umber-tressed Terre Tucker, our November Playmate, an emerald-eyed 19-year-old who ripened under Arizona sunshine and emigrated to Chicago via Beverly Hills and Las Vegas. (“Fair deal,” Playboy, November 1963)

Despite the fairly lengthy work history she cites in her interview as a stewardess, model, and even a bunny at the Chicago Playboy club, it has been suggested that when she posed for the magazine in 1963, she allegedly was only 15. I don’t see how she could have done all that other stuff and only be 15, but I’m not really sure about these pictures now. I think I’m going to have to be selective about which ones I put up, cause I feel like this situation is just too iffy and skeevy.

I got that as-yet unsubstantiated information from Terre’s wiki entry, which contains this lengthy and I assume so-far unedited addendum from a person claiming to be her old friend and former roommate, who gives his name as Dave Nestor:

It needs to be pointed out that Terre Tucker is a fictitious name and history. Terre’s real name was Karen Smith, born to a large family of siblings in July 1948, in Chicago.

Surprisingly, Karen was only 15 years old when she posed for Playboy in June, 1963, turning 16 the following month. After a short training assignment in Chicago, Karen transferred to the Lake Geneva Playboy Club in Wisconsin. She then went on to work in Memphis, St. Louis and finally making her way to the Seattle area.

Karen was a very close friend who lived with me in a suburb of Seattle in 1972. When we met, she was recovering from cervical cancer which was pronounced cured after 5 years. Everyone who met Karen, immediately fell in love with this funny, interesting, beautiful and very sexy person. After meeting her 16-year old sister, be assured, these features run in her family.

(Mr. Nestor, you seem like a nice person, and I don’t want to tell you how to live your life, but you might want to really take that part about her teenaged sister out, because it can be construed as slightly creepy.)

Among other business ventures, Karen was in great demand at car and boat shows where she signed autographs and posed for photos as Terre Tucker, throughout the 1970s and 80s.

Unfortunately, cancer returned in the late 1980s. Karen passed just before Christmas in 1990 and is survived by a son and daughter who shall remain anonymous.

davenestor@yahoo.com

I got no clue who to believe on this one. All I know is in her interview she said her favorite food was ravioli. And I like that stuff, too. The uncontroversial end!