Posts Tagged ‘huac’

Movie Millisecond: Just wish I were dead

July 6, 2011

Gentleman’s Agreement (Elia Kazan*, 1947).

You know. The usual.

Actually, this movie is really excellent and special. It shed light on the prevalent anti-Semitism which proceded the second World War. Everyone is always so busy patting themselves on the back for liberating the concentration camps* during the Allied victory over Hitler & Co. that we tend to forget the Jewish people were still being discriminated against in the countries of their liberators.


via.

Based on a book by Laura Z. Hobson, the film is about a writer who claims to be Jewish in order to write an authentic series on anti-Semitism in America. He quickly learns firsthand how prevalent bigotry against Jewish citizens remained in the post-War years. It was considered a risky film to make, and the anecdotal Hollywood folktale circuit would have it that Jewish heads of other production companies went to producer Darryl Zanuck and asked him not to make the film. I’m not so sure: I think that sounds like marveolous publicity fodder and is more likely a fiction generated by Zanuck to drum up interest in the picture than anything that actually happened — especially since a scene mirroring that situation is included in the film. Inspiration for PR story much? In any case, the buzz paid off: the film was Fox’s top-grossing movie of 1948.



*Kazan himself is of course controversial.
**no question, the liberation of the camps was fantastic and thank God for it, no matter if it was late in the game or for political rather than humanitarian reasons, but I’m just sayin’.

Daily Batman: Meet me in the Batcave

November 3, 2009

Do not fret, little Robin.

Batman has had experience in That Area.

I am considering buying Amy Kiste Nyberg’s Seal of Approval off the amazon. Is this a good move? Worth it? Bueller?

Daily Batman: It happens redux

September 22, 2009

Batgirl is shocked —shocked!— by the homosexuality she is seeing here, you guys. Good gravy.


(by Mark Chamberlain)

Actually, Betty Kane, the first Batgirl, was specifically brought in to the Batman comic story line to quell the HUAC accusations of tacit endorsement of homosexuality in the comics industry. Far better writers than me have tackled the story, including the incredibly wonderful Michael Chabon in his Pulitzer-prize-winning fictional account of a large span of the lives of two cousins as they intersect with comics history, a narrative which includes the time period during which the so-called Comics Code was formed, The Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, a book that is this wonderful journey through several decades that touches on everything from love to Dali to the second World War, and which I recommend with the highest praise to any and everyone.