Posts Tagged ‘party’

Daily Batman: The type

July 21, 2011


via.

I’m the type who’d be happy not going anywhere as long as I was sure I knew exactly what was happening at the places I wasn’t going to. I’m the type who’d like to sit home and watch every party that I’m invited to on a monitor in my bedroom.

(Andy Warhol.)

Et tu?

Puttin’ on the Ritz: Twiggy edition

January 21, 2011

Getting prepped and pumped up for Paolo’s birthday bash tonight with a massive crew of friendohs.


Twiggy, aka Lesley Hornby Lawson, 1967. via fyeahfemmes on the tumblr.

His birthday is the one night of the year where, by group consent, Paolo gets to go completely nuts. Miss D always throws him a wonderful theme party of his choosing* (this year is redneck/white trash, which is of course a delicate minefield of walking the line between good-natured cultural tropes and accidental offense, but we had an insane amount of fun shopping for it) and he gets to go all-out in the business of debauchery. What will the night bring? Only time can tell! Have a fabulous Friday and I’ll catch you guys on the flip.




*Memorable past parties have included Paulopalooza: the Battle of the Bands; Disco Fever; Pauloggio: Casino Night; and a fiesta where Miss D taught me how to make her bomb-ass ceviche.

Dickens December: Another Saturday night at the end of the world — Kick up your heels because why not?

December 11, 2010


“The Three Party” by Hugh Lippe.

Bring in the bottled lightning, a clean tumbler, and a corkscrew.

(Charles Dickens. Nicholas Nickleby, Chapter 49.)

PSA: It’s one of the last Saturday nights of 2010 — go scare up some fun.

Goethe Month: Inaugural ed., “Elective Affinities”

July 3, 2010

AB + CD → BD + AC.


“I think I can briefly sum up in the language of signs. Imagine an A intimately united with a B, so that no force is able to sunder them; imagine a C likewise related to a D; now bring the two couples into contact: A will throw itself at D, C at B, without our being able to say which first deserted its partner, which first embraced the other’s partner.”

(Die Wahverwandtschaften / Elective Affinities, 1809: p. 44.)


“With the alkalies and acids, for instance, the affinties are strikingly marked. They are of opposite natures; very likely their being of opposite natures is the secret of their effect on one another.”

(Ibid., 39)


“They seek one another eagerly out, lay hold of each other, modify each other’s character and form in connection an entirely new substance.”

(Ibid., 39-40.)


“…And those are the cases which are really most important and remarkable — cases where this attraction, this affinity, this separating and combining, can be exibited, the two pairs severally crossing each other; where four creatures, connected previously, as two and two, are brought into contact, and at once forsake their first combination to form into a second.”

(Ibid., 42.)


“In this forsaking and embracing, this seeking and flying, we believe that we are indeed obsrving the effects of some higher determination; we attribute a sort of will and choice to such creatres, and feel really justified in using technical words, and speaking of ‘Elective Affinities.’ ”

(Ibid., 42-43.)


The title is taken from a scientific term once used to describe the tendency of chemical species to combine with certain substances or species in preference to others. The novel is based on the metaphor of human passions being governed or regulated by the laws of chemical affinity, and examines whether or not the science and laws of chemistry undermine or uphold the institution of marriage, as well as other human social relations.

(the wiki)


In the book, people are described as chemical species whose amorous affairs and relationships were pre-determined via chemical affinities similar to the pairings of alchemical species. Goethe outlined the view that passion, marriage, conflict, and free-will are all subject to the laws of chemistry and in which the lives of human species are regulated no differently than the lives of chemical species.

(Ibid.)

You may imagine that it ruffled some feathers upon its publication, as I think you can tell just from those excerpts that it sailed quickly into unpopularly murky waters in its critique of human sexuality and the social institution of marriage as it stood in Goethe’s time. The two chief protagonists, Charlotte and Eduard, are a married and like-minded couple obsessed by logic and reason. Both are on their second marriages, having been widowed by their first, arranged spouses.

With their original, societally-enforced family and financial obligations taken care of by their first marriages, Charlotte and Eduard were free in their second marriage to tie the knot with someone they actually like and to whom they are attracted: they married out of love and sexual desire. But now time has passed and they confirm to one another that they’re a little bored. As an experiment, they decide to invite two attractive, single friends — the Captain, an old acquaintance of Eduard’s, and Ottilie, Charlotte’s young cousin — to their rural mansion for the summer and see how things shake out.

Racy stuff that is peppered with sometimes-depressingly accurate evaluations of human behavior and theories of brain chemistry as it exhibits itself in romance. The novel is still studied because it continues to resonate as a touchstone for debate today between the theories of free will and biological determinism.

All these candid pictures come from the same set of found photos of a swingers’ party c. 1970s, on Square America.

PS: Explanation — It’s Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Month. For brevity, we’ll call it Goethe Month.

PSA: Talking politics socially

June 9, 2010

PSA: It was actually once considered rude to hound people about political issues instead of letting them make private, independent, informed voter choices and not descend in to pointless partisan debate (which often eclipses the issues entirely, creating ever-greater time-and-breath-waste) even and especially with people you claim to call friends. A high level of closeness was required before sailing in to such conversational and public discursive waters, once upon a time. We did not post bulletins and douchey status updates about it, even. Did You Know? Oh, the bygone era of manners.


Via comicallyvintage on the tumblr.

Damn, gorilla! You ain’t got to get punchy. A simple “I disagree” would’ve probably sufficed. But that’s how it is today. Keep your elbows out and your powder dry, kids.

Art and The City, or, “Why I have a brain-boner for Jeremy Forson.”

April 7, 2010

Reppin’ SF.


“Red Dress.”

San Francisco-based artist Jeremy Forson’s work has appeared in Proteus Mag, True Eye, Juxtapoz and Spectrum.


“Light Thief.” My topmost favorite in a field of favorites.

The troop number on the scout’s vest is 415, which is a reference to the telephone exchange for San Francisco. The area code for numbers in The City is 415 (probably at this point another has been added, but that’s what I always think of). I dig it.


“Green Shirt.”

The 2005 CCA grad (although then it was still called California College of Arts and Crafts) also does LP covers and skate decks, because he is too cool for school, and I mean that with the most far-sars and sincere admiration. Also he rocks Stand By Me specs like me and all the other inadvertently hep cats! Witness:


Mr. Forson is on the far left.

See? Super-cute. You feelin’ that?


“Lyon.”

You can enjoy more artcrush cyber-stalkytimes by becoming imaginary friendohs with Mr. Forson on the myspace, fanning him on the facebook, reading his profile at Illustration Mundo, subscribing to his blog, or following him on the twitter.


“Perfect Predator.”

He is also on the flickr, and don’t forget to swing by his etsy shop and pick up some prints. The man has got web presence in spades, which is both smart of him and nice for people who want to see more of his awesome shit. A win-win all day.


“Peonies.”

“The general theme of the series captured all things mundane and beautiful and guilty in San Francisco– documenting night life, body art, apathy within crowds, Victorian homes, fashion, trees, and light pollution; all told through Forson’s mastery of color and haunting imagery.”

(“Artist Spotlight: Jeremy Forson.” 15 Sept 2009. Hilario, Raymond. Weekly Comic Book Review.*)


“Pain Investments.”

“I’m here early, but the kind folks at Edo Salon are nice enough to let me in. Thank you for that. This time around, Jeremy Forson, essays on life in San Francisco– elegant, genteel and Victorian for the most part, but sometimes it can be a long hard night. His tattooed tarts appear to basically update the Patrick Nagel idiom. Nice quality work overall.”

(“Edo Salon: Jeremy Forson – The Lost Fight.” 4 Sept 09. Alan Bamberger. ArtBusiness.com.)


“Gatekeeper.”

If I had to reluctantly accept it at all, I’d have to say that the Nagel comment is at best a dramatic oversimplification. So, no. … No, I just plain respectfully disagree. There was much more to that show than “tattooed tarts,” to boot. So it seems like an upbeat review that is nonetheless somewhat misleading. Nagel reference image in case you’re lost:


Let me be absolutely clear: this is a “work” by Patrick Nagel. It is not done by Jeremy Forson. At all. Do not get confused. Stay with me.

But the gentleman in the review was approaching his visit to Edo from an art-business-consulting p.o.v., so perhaps that plays a part? Like, maybe it benefits art-business-consultants to generalize and “pitch” the “look” of an artist because of how galleries and private collection operate? That weird liminal bit of space between salesmanship mixed with snobbery where the business guy admits he has an artistic side, but knows his primary goal is not to criticize art but to move it into people’s hands? It seems so arbitrary and subjective and also frighteningly commercial to me. Whatever. If it made some old school Nagel-loving collector pick up some of Mr. Forson’s work, then I guess no harm. Back to the good stuff.


“SF Mag noir.” A very scarrry cover. San Francisco Magazine.

Of course, Mr. Forson does not focus his talents exclusively on the clever incorporation of physical and cultural references to San Francisco into already kickass portraiture. He also has some relatively un-415 related work as well.


Cover for “Poe,” Boom! Studios.

“This is one of the most unique ideas I’ve seen cross my table” said BOOM! Studios Editor-in-Chief Mark Waid. “There’s always so much about our classic writers we don’t know, and examining their works and their history can reveal new information, but that’s hardly any fun! POE is alternate history with a horror twist, and is perfect for fans of mysteries.”

(“Enter the World of Poe With Boom! Studios.” 18 May 09. News team. Comic Book Resources.)


“Stargazer.” Unrelated to the Poe information preceding and following it, I just wanted to include it to show Mr. Forson’s range. “Tattoed tarts,” indeed. Pfft.

BOOM!’s new four issue mini-series reveals Poe’s relationship with famous characters and stories from his body of work — like The Raven, the Mask of the Red Death, and many more! Similar to the way SHAKESPEARE IN LOVE showed how William Shakespeare was inspired by his own life events to create some of his creative masterworks, POE takes Edgar Allen Poe on a supernatural adventure that proves to be the fodder for his life’s greatest accomplishments in literature.

(Ibid.)


“Valentine’s teddy bear.”

Dude, that Poe comic sounds all kinds of hella cool. Now I want to get that. Final thought: I. Love. This. The “miwk” part is the part that cracks me up.

Taking Special K up to Humboldt for the next several days, so I’m going to pack, schedule some ghost posts, and be mainly outie. Don’t take any wooden nickels and I’ll catch you on the flip!





*I kind of ♥ the WCBR forever. Swar to gar. Smart, genuinely heartfelt reviews. I rely on them a lot when I have spare cash burning a hole in my pocket and it’s a Wednesday (comics day).