Posts Tagged ‘Sea King’

Music Moment: Eisley, “Sea King”

January 10, 2010

Eisley – Sea King


via igor+andré

At the bottom of the ocean lives a Sea King
He was my king
He was so proud, diamonds in his crown
He was so proud, always so proud


The male of the species is the Nokk. He lives in lakes, ponds, rivers, and waterfalls. The Nokk drags people down if they play too close to the edge of the water or attempt to pick water lilies. He is most dangerous after sunset. To see or hear the Nokk means someone will drown. He is often heard shrieking during shipwrecks.

(A Field Guide to Demons, Fairies, Fallen Angels, and Other Subversive Spirits. Mack, Carol and Dinah. 1999. New York: Macmillan. p. 33.)


I’m going away,
I can’t stay
and I pray he finds out someday…

Sea King,
Sea king,
can’t you see that you’re so silly?
Sea King,
I know things,
and without love you won’t get far.


The Nokk has been seen as a horse or half a horse, as half a ship, or a gleaming silver coin or ring. The Nokk plays music on a golden harp to lure his victim closer if his precious-object disguise doesn’t work. (Ibid.)


Esao Andrews, “Sweet Wilderness.”

In aquatic towns below us,
reigns a Sea King,
he was my king.
Gold and glitter was bubbling all around him,
all around him, pearls in his hands.

I’m going away,
I can’t stay
and I pray he finds out someday…


Sea King,
Sea king,
can’t you see that you’re so silly?
Sea King,
I know things,
and without love you won’t get far.


via sapphoria on the tumblr

It was all he ever knew
It was all he ever knew
It was all he ever knew
and that’s sad.


“Oahu 2” by Allen Birbach, Spider Awards nominee.

Sadko entered and pursued his fleeting bride through the endless torturous crypts of four sea-oceans; at last he found her in the palace of the Sea-King.

“In sooth, Sadko, thou art a master-player on the gusly,” smiled the monarch, “prithee, play for me upon thy harp.”

Sadko perceived he could do no other than heed the behest of the Sea-King, wherefore, setting his harp in tune, he plucked the strings.


Good Bye,” by Esao Andrews

The heart of the Sea-King’s daughter beat in tune to Sadko’s playing, so that with sweet blandishment he won her back, whereafter they dwelt in love and felicity in the coral-chambered castle beneath the sea.

(Romance of Russia, From Rurik to Bolshevik, Elizabeth Williams Champney and Frère Champney. 1921. London: GP Putnam’s Sons, p. 178.)