Posts Tagged ‘Sir Duke’

Music Moment: Stevie Wonder, “Sir Duke”

March 8, 2010


From his album Songs in the Key of Life, Motown Records, 1976.

Stevie Wonder – Sir Duke


Music is a world within itself
With a language we all understand
With an equal opportunity
For all to sing, dance and clap their hands


The king of all, Sir Duke (Ellington).

But just because a record has a groove
Don’t make it in the groove
But you can tell right away at letter A
When the people start to move


Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong LP sleeve.

They can feel it all over
They can feel it all over people
They can feel it all over
They can feel it all over people


Glenn Miller.

Music knows it is and always will
Be one of the things that life just won’t quit
But here are some of music’s pioneers
That time will not allow us to forget


Count Basie and Duke Ellington, recording circa 1950.

There’s Basie, Miller, Satchmo
And the king of all, Sir Duke
And with a voice like Ella’s ringing out
There’s no way the band can lose


Miles Davis and John Coltrane are not named in this song, but they still belong.

You can feel it all over
You can feel it all over people
You can feel it all over
You can feel it all over people


Just Ella.

You can feel it all over
You can feel it all over people
You can feel it all over
You can feel it all over people


Count Basie performing “Ain’t Misbehavin’.”

You can feel it all over
You can feel it all over people
You can feel it all over
You can feel it all over people


Louis blows.

Can’t you feel it all over?
Come on let’s feel it all over people
You can feel it all over
Everybody — all over people


Original caption: “A number of the greatest jazz musicians in the world gathered last night 1/8/1971 at the Tropicana Htel in Las Vegas to pay tribute to the “grandaddy” of jazz, Louis “Satchmo” Armstrong. Seventy years old and still going strong, Armstrong received a trophy topped by a silver trumpet mouthpiece from two other all-time greats, Ella Fitzgerald (L) and Duke Ellington (R).” (source)

Rolling Stone magazine ranked Stevie’s Songs in the Key of Life at no. 56 out of 500 on their Greatest Albums list in 2003. “Sir Duke” was released as a single for radio play in March of 77 and reached number one on the Billboard charts in May, where it stayed for three weeks.